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What's the Difference Between an Addiction Studies and a Psychology Degree?

A bachelor’s degree in Psychology, by itself, does not qualify you for a specific job in the field of Psychology. It takes at least a master’s degree to work in organizational psychology, or sometimes psychology at a school. To become a licensed clinical psychologist, most states require you to earn a Doctor of Psychology (Psy. D).

Employment in the field of addiction counseling, however, does not require an advanced degree. Instead, there is a certification process that is administered by certifying bodies in every state, each having slightly different policies and requirements.

So how does a degree from City Vision University help you to become a certified addiction counselor? While the rules vary somewhat from state to state, generally a bachelor’s degree in Addiction Studies means you will have met all of the educational requirements for certification. Many states also require fewer supervised hours for those who have a degree in this field. Some will actually automatically confer a higher credential to degree holders.

Because City Vision University is a NAADAC Approved Academic Education Provider, this means that the credits you earn are most likely to be accepted by your state board to meet their educational requirements. Along with the education requirements, certifying bodies also require that you pass written examinations and document that you have fulfilled the required supervised clinical hours. Most will also require that you present a case study that is reviewed by your peers.

Because the Addiction Studies program is so closely tied to practical application, we recommend our Addiction Studies program for students who wish to serve in the field more quickly and inexpensively. You will learn psychology and counseling basics, all with an orientation toward Addiction Studies jobs.

We hope our course of study meets your career goals. If you have further questions, please contact info [at] cityvision [dot] edu.